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Using frameworks to communicate systems level insights

Collaborative Framework to improve school attendance

Laura Trent, Esq., Senior Consultant at Spark Policy InstituteThe Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (JJDP) Council has a tall order – prevent youth from entering the justice system or from penetrating deeper into the justice system. The goal cannot be met through program implementation alone. The systems serving the youth must change how they work together (or begin working together) in order to meet the needs of “at-risk” youth.

In 2013, the JJDP Council recognized the need for an alternative approach to addressing “status offenses” (only a crime because of a youth’s age) like truancy (missing too much school). They funded four truancy demonstration pilots in Colorado to work across systems in order to prevent and intervene in truant behavior.

Our new report, Evaluation of Truancy Prevention and Early Intervention takes a retrospective look at the four pilots and includes reflections from stakeholders in schools, courts and the justice system. This led to our Collaborative Framework to Improve Educational Attainment (below), which identifies critical areas and components Colorado’s broader juvenile field must address to work together to improve school engagement.

Collaborative Framework to improve school attendance
This framework outlines the importance of partnerships, prevention, and intervention approaches, and sustainability in supporting Colorado youth and families in the education and justice systems.

At Spark, we understand the importance of connecting theoretical frameworks with on-the-ground  perspectives to ensure our work is actionable.

We facilitated a dialogue with the JJDP Council on the evaluative findings and asked whether it resonated, what was missing, and how it could be built upon. We were able to map the framework to the reality of the stakeholders needs because of our participatory approach (see Spark’s toolkit on Tools for Engaging Nontraditional Voices). Their input made clear that there is room for the framework to not only serve as a guide to improving school engagement, but more broadly to meet the needs of at-risk youth through a collaborative approach.

For more about the work of the truancy demonstration pilots and truancy in Colorado visit the Colorado Division of Criminal Justice website.