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Strengthening Partnerships for Education Through Collaborative Community Action and Collective Impact

Current systems are not working to meet different community’s needs across the Denver Metro area, especially when it comes to our educational systems, such as the early identification of young learners’ needs to the persistence of equity gaps in educational attainment and completion.

In Colorado less than half of Colorado children receive developmental screenings to identify potential social, emotional or behavioral challenges or developmental delays; which if unidentified can result in serious challenges that affect all areas of their lives. College enrollment and completion rates in Colorado demonstrate that equity gaps remain, with degree attainment for Hispanic and African American adults in Denver remaining significantly lower than those of white adults: 29% and 39%, compared to 64%[1]. These issues, among so many others, lead us to the question: what would it take to change the stats and create a more equitable education system in Colorado?

During our  October Social Innovators Breakfast we had the opportunity to meet and learn from three great organizations, who shared their experiences and learnings in achieving their goals through collaborative community action (CCA) and collective impact (CI). The panelist included:

  • Diana Higuera, Executive Director and Founder of the Rocky Mountain Welcome Center (RMWC), whose mission is to foster intercultural learning, understanding and integration among immigrants, refugees and Colorado residents through different programs and partnerships.
  • Eileen Auer Bennet, Executive Director of Assuring Better Child and Health Development (ABCD), a statewide nonprofit focused on improving the lives of Colorado children through early identification of developmental needs.
  • Therese Ivancovich, Executive Director of The Denver Education Attainment Network (DEAN), a collective impact initiative focused on increasing educational attainment and closing the attainment gap for students in Denver.

The panelists shared what brought them to the CCA/CI space, talked about how CCA/CI has evolved their work, discussed how they measure impact, and gave advice on starting or growing a CCA/CI initiative. We are grateful to our three panelist and we a sharing a reflection of learnings we gathered from these organizations that you can use to drive your own Collective Impact initiative. No matter what stage an initiative is at, these are some skills we learned that an initiative must have:

Commitment – ensure leaders and partners are committed to the vision and overall goal of the initiative.

Be Nimble – change the initiative direction, if necessary, and be able to take partners along the way.

Build Trust – develop trust within an initiative to not only create partner buy-in, but also build confidence between partners if the direction has to shift.

Do Your Homework – know who is at the table and what their motivations are.

Do What You Are Best At – know what your strengths are and focus on those. Let other partners do what they are best at.

We are passionate about bringing a systems lens to all of our work and often share resources and ideas for how to find and act on leverage points, use systems mapping to help change the game, and how experimentation can help drive social change. Additionally, we have many free tools and resources available if you are considering or already involved in a collaborative community action or collective impact initiative, this includes our full report When Collective Impact Has an Impact.

 

Do you have other lessons to share? Is there a topic you would like to see us explore in this blog? Tell us in the comments! Stay up to date on Spark latest news by following us on social media and subscribe to our newsletter today!

[1] Erase Equity Gaps. (2017). Colorado Department of Higher Education. Available: http://masterplan.highered.colorado.gov/goal-2-erase-equity-gaps/

Related Publications: When Collective Impact Has an Impact